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'floor targets  

School Test Results

 

The following tables show our school assessment results over the past few years. We have also included some national averages, to allow you to compare our results with other schools. 

 

By clicking on this link you can find more detailed information about our school results and how these compare to other schools more locally. This is the Department for Education's 'performance tables' website.

 

2016

 

Below is a brief summary of our results in some of the key areas that Ofsted look at when judging schools. Ofsted introduced a new way of assessing children this year, with ‘levels’ no longer used in years 2 and 6. For this reason these results cannot be compared to previous years. We can provide some additional information on this, should you want to know more.

Early Years (Reception): 16 children (6.3% each)

  • Children attaining a ‘Good Level of Development’ is 81% (nationally this is usually around 66%). School has now been in line with or above national figures for Early Years for three consecutive years.
  • Children making at least ‘typical progress’: 94%
  • Children making ‘better than typical progress’: 63%

 Phonics Reading test (year 1): 18 children (5.6% each)

  • Children passing the test is 79% (nationally this is usually around 75%). School has now been in line with or above national figures for phonics for three consecutive years

End Key Stage One (year 2): 10 children (10% each)

  • 80% Reading (national was 75%)
  • 50% Writing (national was 65%)
  • 70% Maths (national was 73%)

 End Key Stage Two (year 6): 8 children (12.5% each)

ATTAINMENT: Children who reached the expected standard

  • 75% Reading (national was 66%)
  • 75% Writing (national was 74%)
  • 88% Grammar, punctuation and spelling (national was 72%)
  • 50% Mathematics (national was 70%)
  • 25% (2 children) attained at the expected standard in all of reading, writing and maths). 

ATTAINMENT: SCALED SCORES: the Department for education measure schools on the average score children get in ther tests

  • Reading: 103 (national was 103)
  • Writing: scaled scores are not used in writing
  • Grammar, punctuation and spelling: 103 (national was 104)
  • Mathematics 101  (national was 103)

ATTAINMENT: children who attained at the higher level 

  • Reading: 25% (national was 25%)
  • Writing: 13% (national was 15%)
  • Grammar, punctuation and spelling 13% (national was 22%)
  • Mathematics: 13% (national was 17%)

PROGRESS: The average progress of children from year 2 to the end of year 6. 

  • Reading:  -0.9
  • Writing: -2.2
  • Mathematics: -5.1

Ofsted state that schools with less than 11 children are exempt from the minimum 'floor targets’ they expect schools to reach as the data becomes unreliable. For example, although we are 20% below national figures on maths in year 6, this equates to ‘one and a bit children’ (each of our 8 children = 12.5%) so sets of data of this size this can become unreliable – a challenge facing all small schools. However, it would clearly have been nice to have this particular figure as strong as the others. WE have worked very hard on improving mathematics this year, and we can see this having a positive impact lower down the school. WE are now starting to see the impact of the changes we have made to our mathematics, in our everyday maths lessons, from children books and from what the children tell us.

 

25% (2 children) attained at the expected standard in all of reading, writing and maths (national figure was 53%). two additional children were a few marks off making this 50% - again, the small size of the cohort this year has made comparison with national figures tricky. Tow children were very close to making this 50%.

 

 In both years 2 and 6 ‘teacher assessment’ is used in writing rather than ‘externally marked tests’. Teachers make their own judegments based on the writing children produce through the year and the validity of these judegments are ‘quality controlled’ in a number of ways. The writing in year 2 was 50%, although could arguably have been 70%. Miss Margetson (our year 2 Teacher) quite rightly ‘erred on the side of caution’ with some children. Above all our data needs to be open to robust scrutiny and ‘beyond reproach’, which I believe it is, and successful monitoring visits by the Local Education Authority support our view on this

 

 Our staff work relentlessly hard to be above national figures in all areas. Overall we are pleased with the above results. It has been an extremely challenging year in primary education, with an enormous amount of change to come to terms with. Notably, the new national curriculum is considerably more challenging than in previous years with lots of new content.  The children have worked very hard this year and have coped with the changes well. They overwhelmingly say they are happy in school and enjoy learning – a testament to their resilience. It should also be remembered of course that most of the above data is based on testing which is often a blunt measure which doesn’t necessarily ‘capture’ what a child has learnt or is capable of doing on a day to day basis.

 

 Myself, our Governing Body and our ‘Subject Leaders’ are already working hard on looking at the results in close detail (differences between boys and girls, children with additional learning needs etc.). From this we will be basing our plans for 2016-17. We aim for every single child to make the most progress they possibly can and our work on this will continue in September. Your child’s end of year school report will provide you with details of how we feel they done this year. As ever, if you would like to discuss your child’s progress with your child’s Teacher – just ask. 

 

2012-15

 

Children making expected progress by the time they leave school

 

Reading

Writing

Maths

2012

100%

96%

100%

2013

75%

100%

69%

2014

100%

100%

83%

2015

92%

92%

42%

Approximate national average 2012-15: 89%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Children working at particular levels by the time they leave school

 

 

Reading

Writing

Maths

 

2012

Level 4+

100%

89%

100%

Level 5+

72%

28%

39%

Level 6

0%

0%

0%

 

2013

Level 4+

88%

100%

69%

Level 5+

38%

31%

31%

Level 6

0%

0%

6%

 

2014

Level 4+

95%

100%

89%

Level 5+

67%

56%

39%

Level 6

0%

0%

6%

 

2015

Level 4+

75%

67%

33%

Level 5+

25%

0%

8%

Level 6

0%

0%

8%

Approximate national averages 2012-15

  • Level 4+: 87%
  • Level 5+: 41%
  • Level 6: 2%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Children working at particular levels by the time they leave key stage 1 (in year 2)

 

 

Reading

Writing

Maths

2013

Level 2+

100%

69%

77%

Level 3

31%

0%

8%

2014

Level 2+

88%

91%

91%

Level 3

27%

16%

36%

2015

Level 2+

87%

87%

88%

Level 3

44%

19%

31%

Approximate national average 2013-15

  • Level 2+: 89%
  • Level 3: 25%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Children working at the expected level in phonics (reading ability)  levels by the time they leave key stage 1

2013

57%

2014

93%

2015

90%

Approximate national average 2012-15: 75%

 

   

Children reaching the expected level by the time they leave Reception

2013

27%

2014

86%

2015

72%

Approximate national average 2012-15: 59%

 

 

 

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