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Pupil Premium Funding

 

What is Pupil Premium Funding? 

 

“The Government believes that the Pupil Premium, which is additional to main school funding, is the best way to address the current underlying inequalities between children eligible for free school meals (FSM) and their wealthier peers by ensuring that funding to tackle disadvantage reaches the pupils who need it most”, Department for Education, 2012.

 

In short, it is recognised that children nationally, in receipt of free school meals achieve less well than other children. In order to ensure these children achieve at least at the same rate as other children, the Government provides additional funding.

 

What does this mean at our school?

 

Principles

  • Its about relationships. Improving outcomes for disadvantaged pupils is a whole school priority. Strong relationships between Teachers and pupils and between parents and the school play a vital part in supporting this. 

  • It's about perseverance. We have high expectations of what children can achieve - 'labels' put on children can hinder future success. Children who are already working at the expected standard for their age are therefore targeted for rapid progress and all children are expected to make rapid progress so that they are as prepared as they can be for the next stage in their education. 

  • It is about understanding barriers. We take advantage of the small nature of our school and use our strong relationships and 'whole school approach' to gain the broader picture of each child and what may be inhibiting their progress. We look at home life and attendance for example and liaise with other professionals, in health and social care, for example. 

  • It's about developing the 'whole child'. Funding is used to improve academic outcomes but is also used to help develop children's social skills, self esteem, self belief and independence. However, we recognise that the best way to achieve all these goals is ultimately through securing each child's academic success. 

  • One size does not fit all. Funding is spent in a variety of ways, depending on the individual needs of each child. 

Accountability 

  • High quality 'first teaching' by Teachers and Teaching Support Staff is what makes the most difference to children's progress and this is the foundation of all our work. Ensuring all teaching is at least good and is developing into outstanding practice is always a priority. Teachers are the ones who are primarily accountable for the outcomes of all children and they retain 'ownership' of all learning which our vulnerable pupils receive. 

  • Children making 'expected progress' is unambitious. If additional funding is being spent, we expect additional progress to be made. For this reason, focussed targets for improvement are carefully considered, precise interventions to help children are put in place and 'rapid progress' expected in those areas. We also make sure any 'learning intervention programmes' we use are ones with proven track records.

  • All children are provided with individualised support in those areas they require help in. This is then monitored to ensure it is taking place as agreed and is regularly reviewed, through 'pupil progress meetings' for example, to ensure it is having the desired impact. All school leaders know who our disadvantaged children are and their role in supporting them, Subject Leaders for Mathematics and English for example 

  • We have a designated 'Link Governor' for Pupil premium which ensure the school leadership are held to account for the use of funding and the difference it makes. Regularly reporting to the Governing body means that it remains a high priority.

  • We share data from a range of sources - some from school, some from nationally recognised bodies - which ensures Governors and other leaders are aware of the impact of our funding on outcomes for pupils compared to other schools. A summary of this data is also shared with parents on our website. (see below)

  • We also ensure we establish strong working relationships with parents, whose support and reciprocal working is essential to success. We want parents to be well informed about how their child is doing and feel part of the process of their learning. We have an 'open door' policy at Sutton CE, so frequent and informal discussions help build this shared understanding and trust. Parents are consulted on the best use of the funding each year. 

  • To ensure value for money the school's work is informed by the Education Endowment Foundation Toolkit, which assesses the impact of spending initiatives against their cost. However, effective evaluation of the success of the funding is based on whether it works for our individual children. 

Provision

Funding could be used in any given year on:

  • Providing support through one-to-one or small group work to focus on helping children overcoming gaps in learning. 

  • Acquiring effective resources and training for staff aimed at raising standards.

  • Providing children with access to free or subsidised extracurricular clubs and / or residential visits. This also helps children develop a fuller understanding of the 'real world'. This can include before and after-school club / wraparound care to try and encourage children who may be poor attendees to come to school and also for them to complete homework.

  • Supporting children's social, emotional and behavioural development to ensure they are 'ready to learn' and are happy and settled in school. 

  • Providing swimming lessons for all children; focused on ensuring that all children reach the national target of being able to swim 25 metres by the time they leave school.

  • 'Booster Sessions' in English and Mathematics for Pupil Premium children in Year 5/6, these session being run before or after school.

  • We can provide children with the loan of school resources such as laptops.

  • However, many things we do in school to support our disadvantaged children require no additional funding; ensuring they play a full and active role in leading collective worship and through providing them with positions of responsibility on student bodies, for example.

 

The Impact of Pupil Premium funding 2013-16

 

  • The table below compares children in receipt of Pupil Premium to other children nationally when they leave school in year 6 (the end of key stage 2) for the past 4 years. 

  • Children usually make strong progress in reading and consistently do so in writing. In maths, there is an upward trend in rates of achievement.

 

The % of Pupil Premium children making expected progress by the end of year 6

(national averages for children NOT in receipt of additional funding are in brackets)

 

 

Reading

Writing

Maths

2013

(1 child)

Expected progress

0%

(89%

100%

(93%)

0%

(90%)

2014

(3 children)

Expected progress

100%

(92%)

100%

(94%)

67%

(91%)

2015

(3 children)

Expected progress

100%

(94%)

100%

(95%)

100%

(90%)

2016

(No children)

Expected progress

-

-

-

 

 

 

 

 

  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • Overall, an 'upward trend' is clear, and this reflects what we see in school for those children in other year groups. 

 

The pupil premium Grant allocation for 2015-16

 

What did we spend it on? 

 

The school received £11,880. We used the funding last year to provide additional support for children through:  

  • Ensuring regular one-on-one learning opportunities to boost children’s progress in the areas they need most
  • Ensuring identified children are provided with appropriate emotional and social support.
  • Ensuring all children in receipt of funding, and who go swimming, are able to go.
  • Ensuring all children in receipt of funding attend all class trips
  • Ensuring identified children are in full school uniform and are well presented.
  • Ensuring identified children are provided opportunities to develop social skills in a safe and structured way, through wraparound care
  • Ensuring family respite and quality family time are supported through wraparound care.
  • Ensuring completion of homework and 1:1 Reading are completed by children
  • Ensuring all children can attend school residential visits. 

 

 

Pupil Premium Funding 2015-16 (9 pupils x £1320 = £11,880)

Use of funding

Cost

Provide high quality weekly booster and pupil performance review sessions.

= £2,500

Ensuring all children entitled to attend school residential visits, can do.

£150 for visit x 4 pupils

=£600

Ensuring family respite and quality family time are supported through wraparound care.

3 x weekly £5 sessions at after school club x 39 wks.

= £585

Additional afternoon booster sessions for full year, as required. This pays for 2 hours additional afternoon support for this child through the year

=£1320

Ensuring completion of homework and 1:1 Reading are completed.

2 x weekly £5 sessions at after school club x 39 weeks

= £780

Ensuring a child is provided opportunities to develop social skills in a safe and structured way through wraparound care

2 x weekly £5 sessions at After school club x 39 wks.

 = £390

Ensuring a child is, in full school uniform and is wearing clean clothes.

Purchase of washing machine @ £400

Purchase of 2 x full

sets of school uniform @£200

= £600

Ensuring all children in receipt of funding attend all class trips

£30 x 8 pupils = £240

Ensuring all children in receipt of funding, and who go swimming are able to go.

£3.25 / wk x 39 wks x 4 pupils

= £507

Ensuring children are provided with appropriate pastoral support and learning around emotional and social intelligence (ELSA Programme)

3 x 30 min. sessions weekly @£14 hour x 39 wks.

= £819

Ensuring regular one-on-one learning opportunities.

5 x 20 mins daily @£14 / hour x 4 children x 39 wks

.= £3638

Total expenditure

£11,880 

 

What difference did it make?  

  • For one child, we used the funding to provide additional support, to ensure they would be working at the expected level for their age in maths, as they needed to make more rapid progress to 'catch up'.
  • This has been achieved.  
  • For one child, we used the funding to provide additional support, to ensure they would be working at the expected level for their age in reading as they needed to make more rapid progress to 'catch up'. They also received targeted adult support to make sure they passed their year 1 phonics screening check.
  • This has been achieved.  
  • For one child, we used the funding to provide additional support, to ensure they would be working at the expected level in reading and mathematics as they needed to make more rapid progress to 'catch up'.
  • This has been achieved.  
  • For one child, we used the funding to provide additional support, to ensure they would be working at the expected level in reading and mathematics and pass their year phonics screening check.
  • This has been partly achieved: This child made rapid progress in maths and is now working at the expected level for their age. Reading progress was 'typical'  but was not enough for them to ‘catch up’ to where they should be. In addition, they did not pass the phonics screening check, scoring 27/40 (the pass mark was 32). 
  • For one child, we used the funding to provide additional support, to ensure they would be working at the expected level in writing, as they needed to make more rapid progress to 'catch up'. This child also received additional  adult support to develop their 'phonics' so they could pass the year phonics screening check, which they did not pass in year 1.
  • This has been achieved: This child made strong progress in writing and is now working at the expected level for their age. In addition, this child passed their phonics screening check 're-test', scoring 37/40 (the pass mark was 32)  
  • For one child, we used the funding to provide appropriate pastoral support and learning around emotional and social skills, so they could become more settled and happy in their dealings with other children, this having been a previous challenge for this child. Funding was also spent on ensuring homework and learning of key skills was completed. 
  • This has been achieved: This child is now mixing more happily and confidently with others, ensuring they are 'ready to learn' from returning from break times and dinner times.
  • For one child, we used the funding to ensure they attended swimming lessons to ensure they could swim 25m by the time they leave school. In addition, funding was spent on providing ‘wraparound’ care to ensure 'family respite' supported a smooth start to the school day. 
  • This has been achieved: This child can now swim 25 unaided, this being the national curriculum target for primary aged-children. In addition, this child is happy and settled in school and their behaviour choices have improved markedly through the year. In addition, this child came on the annual school residential, ensuring they participated in outdoor and adventurous games and activities, this being a national curriculum requirement.  
  • For one child, we used the funding to ensure they progressed faster than other children in order to ‘catch up' in writing and maths. In addition, we used the funding to ensure they received 1 on 1 adult support in swimming lessons to ensure they could swim 25m by the time they leave school. We also used the funding to provide them with appropriate pastoral support and learning around emotional and social skills, so they can become more settled and happy in their dealings with other children.
  • This has been achieved: Gap is closing in writing and maths, with rapid progress having been made. This child is not yet able to swim 25m but increasingly will try to swim unaided, with support. This child now plays a fuller part in school life and appears happier and more confident. This child also came on the annual school residential, ensuring they participated in outdoor and adventurous games and activities, this being a national curriculum requirement.  
  • For one child, we used the funding to ensure they progressed faster than other children in order to ‘close the gap’ between them and other children of their age in maths. We also used the funding to provide them with appropriate pastoral support and learning around emotional and social skills, so they could become more settled and happy in their dealings with other children.
  • This has been achieved: the 'gap' is closing rapidly in maths, with two years worth of progress being achieved in 1 year.  This child now plays a full part in school life and appears happier and more confident and in control of their emotions. This child also came on the annual school residential, ensuring they participated in outdoor and adventurous games and activities, this being a national curriculum requirement. 

 

The pupil premium grant allocation for 2016-17

 

The school received £11,880. 

  • The funding will be predominantly used to provide extra adult support. Children will be specifically targeted for those areas of learning in which they need to ‘close the gap’ and catch up with their peers; mainly in reading, writing or mathematics - depending on which areas they need the most help in.
  • Some of our older children require additional time in the afternoons to go over those areas of maths and English from the morning which they struggled to understand - so they are ready for the next day's learning. This is to prevent these children from 'falling further behind' each day. In addition, some of the funding is used so we can deliver a program called 'Success @ Arithmetic' which helps children catch up in their mathematics. Lots of school's use this and say it works really well, but we are monitoring it carefully to ensure it is making a difference. Also, in 2016 we felt that children on their year 6 SATs tests could have done better at the arithmetic questions - so we want to make sure children are developing these particular skills.
  • Some of our younger children require additional one-on-one reading time with an adult and some require targeted work to improve their phonics because they didn't pass the year 1 screening check.  In addition, some of the funding is used so we can deliver a 'catch up programme' called 'Speaking and Listening Through Narrative'. Some of these children's listening skills need to be more comprehensively developed to provide the foundations for good reading and writing skills. 
  • Some pupils are also benefiting from targeted work on helping them manage their anger and emotions more positively, which can sometimes provide a 'barrier' to their learning.
  • Some children are also benefiting from work in small groups which seek to help them develop their social skills and confidence, as these can sometimes inhibit their wellbeing in school. 
  • We also want to continune to ensure all children in school can attend our annual residential trip. We feel that all children should be able to take part in this memorable and exciting experience during their time with us. 
  • We also want to ensure all children can swim 25m by the time they leave school, so we are providing one-on-one swimming coaching for those children who need it. This is a national currucullum requirement and some children have not had much experience of swimming before, so using the funding in this way seeks to address this. 

We will ensure the funding is having a positive impact by reviewing how well children are doing in the subjects in which they need to catch up. We do this termly via formal testing, but continually assess how well children are doing each day in school. 

Additionally, children's progress in swimming will be monitored to ensure they are swimming increasingly independently and those children in year 6 can swim 25m unaided. 

 We will review this each term and will assess the overall impact of additional funding in June 2017 to assess how well it has been spent. 

 

 

Pupil Premium Funding 2016-17 (9  pupils x £1320 = £11,880)

Use of funding

Use of funding

Cost

Child A

Additional afternoon booster sessions for full year

£1320

Child B

Additional afternoon booster sessions for full year

£1320

Child C

Additional afternoon booster sessions for full year

£1320

Child D

Additional afternoon booster sessions for full year

£1320

Child E

Additional afternoon booster sessions for full year

£1320

Child F

Additional afternoon booster sessions for full year, as required

Attendance on school residential trip

Swim 25m unaided

£1110

£170

£40

Child G

Additional afternoon booster sessions for full year, as required

Attendance on school residential trip

Swim 25m unaided

£1110

£170

£40

Child H

Additional afternoon booster sessions for full year, as required

Attendance on school residential trip

Swim 25m unaided

£1110

£170

£40

Child I

Additional afternoon booster sessions for full year, as required

Attendance on school residential trip

Swim 25m unaided

£1110

£170

£40

£1320 x 4 children in Willow class  = £5280 this pays for afternoon hours of support provided by an Advanced Teaching Assistant

£1320 x 1 children in Birch class. This pays for 2 hours additional afternoon support for 1 child through the year,

£1110 x 4 children In Oak Class = £4480 this pays towards the cost of afternoon support hours provided by an Advanced Teaching Assistant

Total expenditure

£14,520

 

 

  

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